Kingston Lacy: Winter and Summer

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I’ve visited Kingston Lacy at different times of the year, and have been struck by the differences between similar scenes I’ve photographed.  The following were taken at the end of December last year, and this week.  Photographs©VCUzzell2016

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Photographs©VCUzzell2016

 

 

 

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Relaxation and Minions at Kingston Lacy

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I never tire of Kingston Lacy; in all seasons it has something for the visitor. Rich colours in the autumn, exposed structures of bare trees in the winter, flowers beginning to emerge in spring and the glorious greens of summer.  It was the last of those which I experienced yesterday, as myself and a friend strolled along the paths and through the gardens, welcoming the scent of rhododendrons and freshly cut grass as we waited for the sunlight to filter through the canopy above, to be (hopefully) caught in the lens of our cameras.  Many of the flowers had started to go over, but in the case of alliums, what remained was a beautiful exposed structure where the petals had been.

It was my companion’s first visit to Kingston Lacy and I had the honour of showing her around a place which has become quite familiar to me, and a welcome space to relax and recharge my batteries. The last time I had been there was the weekend after Christmas on a somewhat grey day with plenty of mud to squelch through, so the dry paths and array of colour yesterday was a welcome sight.  We stopped for a delicious slice of lemon drizzle cake in the kitchen garden, and admired the imaginative scarecrows protecting the precious produce growing in the allotments.

Despite having spent four hours strolling and snapping, we still hadn’t covered the whole estate, nor looked round the house. So a return visit is guaranteed!

Photographs©VCUzzell2016

For more information on Kingston Lacy, follow the link below:

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/kingston-lacy

I visited Kingston Lacy at my own expense.

Kingston Lacy – a winter walk

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Summer is probably one of the most popular seasons to visit the countryside, but its opposite on the wheel of the year can also be just as rewarding. Winter reveals the structural beauty of woods, with patterns; shapes and forms of the trees come to the fore.  They are also less busy, and you can almost have a place like Kingston Lacy, which is just outside Wimborne in Dorset, all to yourself.

It certainly felt that way as myself and my family arrived there this morning in light drizzle, wondering if we’d done the right thing in venturing out, but decided we might as well make the most of it, and we were glad we had because the grounds were much quieter than in the height of tourist season; and although the house itself was only open on the ground floor due to the time of year, it was the woodland around it which most interested us, so we didn’t mind.

If you’re going to visit during the winter months, or even after plenty of rain, beware as the paths through the woods can be very muddy in places, making accessibility for some difficult. However, the walk around the grounds, which include the woods, Japanese garden and Kitchen garden, is generally level and easy going.  It took us about an hour and a half, but we didn’t rush and took photos along the way.

There’s a good café and toilets at the start, in addition to a kiosk and more facilities for a comfort break near the Kitchen garden and allotments. There’s also a National Trust shop and a few further buildings to explore, which have changing displays according to the season.  The house itself is lovely, and well worth taking your time over.  As it was low season, it had been shuttered-up, and the statues which surround it were also covered.  So if you want to appreciate the building at its best, then wait for the spring.

Being among the various browns and deep greens this morning, with leaves mulching under foot; the damp smell of the earth filling the air, was just what I needed to continue re-charging my batteries ahead of the coming year.

For more information follow the link below:

http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/kingston-lacy

Photographs©VCUzzell2015

 

‘Most doors open if you try’

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‘Most doors open if you try’, one of my favourite lines from a much loved childhood book, Once Upon A Rainbow, by Naomi Lewis.

This photograph was taken a couple of years ago on a visit to Kingston Lacy House in Dorset.  A walk around the grounds reveals many such small doors; some standing alone, like magical portals to another dimension, while others are attached to trees, like this one.  I wonder where it leads to …